MediaShout Legacy Support
 
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Recommended System Specifications
Operating System
CPU
RAM
Graphics Hardware
Other Hardware

Recommended System Specifications

 

XP

Vista

minimum

recommended

minimum

recommended

CPU

2GHz Intel Pentium 4 or Equivalent

3GHz Pentium 4 or equiv.

3 GHz Intel Pentium 4 or equiv

3.4 Intel Pentium 4 or equiv

RAM

512 MB

1 GB

1 GB

1.5 GB

Drive Space

500 MB

2 GB

500 MB

2 GB

graphics card

dual head card/adapter, full DirectX 9 hardware support

video RAM

128 MB

256 MB

256 MB

512 MB

Other

DVD Drive, Sound Card, Video input for video feed, internet access

Operating System
MediaShout 3.2 is supported for Windows XP Home, Professional and Media Center Edition as well as Windows Vista (all editions except Basic). MediaShout will also work on both 32 and 64 bit versions of these operating systems.

MediaShout 3 will not run on Windows ME, 98 or NT.

Although MediaShout 3.1 may run in a Windows emulator for Linux or Mac OS, to our knowledge no such application can properly emulate the Windows extended desktop feature that is required by MediaShout's dual-screen mode. Which means you may be able to use the MediaShout control screen, but you won't be able to play media to the audience on a second screen.

CPU
A computer's central processing unit is the part that carries out instructions it receives from MediaShout and other applications. Enhancements in v3 cause it to place a higher demand on the CPU than v2 does, so we've significantly raised the minimum required CPU speed, and recommend that you get the fastest CPU you can afford. Though other factors such as the size of the front-side bus affect a CPU's speed and performance, as a general rule, the faster the CPU, the better its performance overall. We also recommend that you stick with Intel Pentium or AMD Athlon models. Avoid Intel Celeron CPUs, which deliver lower performance. On a notebook equipped with an Intel Pentium M (Mobile) CPU, we 1.7 GHz or higher.

RAM
The amount of random-access memory a computer has determines the volume of data it can work with at once. If tasks call for juggling more data than it has RAM to hold, it dumps some of the data to a cache (or temporary storage area on the hard drive) which takes longer to retrieve, thus slowing performance. In MediaShout, video playback is the biggest memory hog, but sounds, high-resolution graphics, and other media types demand lots of it too. An open application also consumes RAM, which explains why closing other applications while running MediaShout can improve performance: there's less data to juggle.

We recommend getting as much RAM as you can afford, especially if you intend to play large video (e.g., AVI), sound (e.g., WAV), or Photoshop files, or need to keep multiple applications open while running MediaShout.

Graphics Hardware
Graphics cards, also called video cards, display cards or display adapters, contain a GPU (graphics processing unit) that generate what's seen on the screen. As a multimedia application, MediaShout demands a lot from a graphics card. And as a dual-screen application, it demands either a dual-head card/display adapter, or two graphics cards. We recommend that you get the fastest, highest-memory graphics hardware you can afford. Additional details:

DirectX 9: This component in Windows provides hardware manufacturers and software developers with a set of tools for maximizing multimedia performance. In video transitions and other enhancements in v3, MediaShout relies on DirectX far more than it did in previous versions. But it can do so only if your computer's graphics card/display adapter exploits DirectX 9 too. Therefore, make sure that the specifications for your graphics hardware specifically state that the device supports DirectX 9: v3 won't run without it.

integrated graphics and shared memory: Some lower-end desktops and notebooks as well as some super-light notebooks come equipped with "integrated graphics" -- the graphics hardware is integrated with the motherboard rather than residing on a separate graphics card or display adapter. In such cases, the system relies on shared memory. With no VRAM of its own, it reserves a portion (e.g., 128 MB) of the computer's RAM to use for graphics processing. In our v3 tests, even when the system has more than enough RAM to share, high-demand tasks such as displaying text over video resulted in unacceptable quality and performance. Therefore, systems with integrated graphics and shared memory (e.g., Intel Extreme Graphics) cannot be relied upon for v3.

dual-head: This term is generally used to describe a desktop graphics card that has two discrete display outputs. Typically, one is a VGA port and the other a DVI port - with a VGA adapter provided in case your display device doesn't accept digital input. (But check the box: Not all dual-head cards come with the adapter, so you may need to pick one up at the computer store.) Some dual-head cards have a video output (composite or S-video) instead of, or in addition to, a second VGA or DVI port. If yo're displaying a video signal (as opposed to a VGA or DVI signal) to the audience, this alternative will work.

dual-display adapter: The graphics hardware in most notebook computers is called a display adapter - a graphics card that's been miniaturized to fit in a very tight space. Most notebooks these days are equipped with a dual-display adapter and don't need a separate video card. Like a desktop's dualhead graphics card, this type of display adapter is capable of outputting two discrete display signals - one to the notebook's own LCD monitor, and another to the display device attached to the external monitor port.

Some lower-priced notebooks as well as some super-light models don;t have dual-display adapters, so you need to check before purchasing. This is critical because, unlike a graphics card in a desktop, a low-end display adapter in a notebook can;t be swapped out with one capable of dual display. Nor can you just add a second card like you can with a desktop. (Currently there are no PCMCIA card or other second-display solutions on the market that meets v3's minimum requirements for graphics hardware.)

graphics cards and slots: Most desktop computers are equipped with expansion slots in the back, to allow installation or replacement of graphics, sound, and other types of cards. The type and number of slots available differs from one computer to another: When shopping for a graphic card, you must first know which type of slot it's going be placed in. The computer's documentation will tell you.

Most desktops still have an AGP (advanced graphics port) slot for its primary graphics card. If you're replacing the primary card and it's in an AGP slot, get an AGP card. Many new computers now come equipped with a PCI Express (PCIe) slot instead of an AGP slot. If you're replacing a PCIe graphics card, be sure the replacement is PCIe too. The remaining slots on your computer are probably standard PCI slots: If you're adding a second graphics card rather than replacing the primary card, make sure you get a PCI card.

graphics hardware brands: We recommend graphics cards and display adapters manufactured by nVidia (GeForce 6600 series or higher) and ATI (Radeon X series or higher). Some users have experienced problems in video playback with Matrox cards, so we do not recommend them.

Other Hardware
DVD drive: MediaShout 3 is capable of playing clips from video DVDs, so at least one DVD drive is required to do this.

sound card: If you intend to play sounds - music, sound effects, video soundtracks, etc., you may want to consider upgrading the computer's sound. If your desktop has integrated sound, we recommend purchase of a quality sound card. The integrated sound in most notebooks ranges from acceptable to awful: almost no notebook is equipped with sound components worthy of the images it can deliver. A USB or PCMCIA device (including models in Sound Blaster's Audigy series) can make a big difference. Notebooks are also more susceptible to ground loop-induced hum, which can often be eliminated simply by feeding the audio through a direct box on its way to the room's sound system.

video capture card or FireWire port: MediaShout 3 is capable of displaying video feeds captured by the computer. To do this it needs to be equipped with a capture card, FireWire port (or in some cases, a USB 2.0 device) that can receive the video signal from a camera, VCR, DVD player or other external video device.